Mar 012019
 
quite in British and American English

Quite! It’s such a common word. Americans use it, Brits use it, and it’s the same word, right? Well no, not quite. Have a look at these sentences. Both Americans and Brits could say them all, but two of them mean different things, depending on whether an American or a Brit says them. Which ones?
1 This is quite interesting.
2 Quite fascinating, in fact.
3 I’m usually quite good at this kind of exercise.
4 But you’re quite correct. This is tricky.

One common meaning of quite in both varieties is ‘completely’. (See 2 and 4 above.) These two sentences mean the same in American and British English.
Fascinating and correct are both ungradable adjectives, so things are either fascinating/correct or not. There’s no half way about it.
But there are other adjectives that are gradable, so for example, there can be different degrees of good or interesting. And that’s where things get complicated and quite means different things. (See 1 and 3 above.)
Watch our latest video to learn more.

 Posted by at 9:03 pm

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